Falling Hydro, Rising Renewables wind from 4.3% to 32.7% net in renewables, excl. hydro in 10 years.

US Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual power capacity additions Report for 2007

Power Eng. International, 21 January 2009 

 

 

Wind generation is rapidly gaining a larger share of total renewable generation. In 2007, wind accounted for 32.7 percent of total net generation from non-hydroelectric renewable sources, as compared to 4.3 percent in 1997. The annual growth in solar thermal and photovoltaic generation has been sufficient for this renewable source to account, on average, for 0.5 percent of all non-hydroelectric renewable energy.

Net generation from conventional hydroelectric plants declined 14.4 percent from 289 million MWh in 2006 to 248 million MWh in 2007. EIA said the decline is consistent with the drought conditions, which according to the National Climatic Data Center prevailed over the West and Southeast for much of the year.

Net generation produced by renewable energy sources, excluding hydroelectric generation, grew by 9.0 percent as compared to 10.5 percent growth in 2006. Renewable energy accounted for 2.5 percent or 105 million MWh of total net generation in 2007.

Wind generation was the second largest renewable energy source, contributing 34 million MWh or 0.8 percent of total net generation in 2007. Geothermal power plants supplied 15 million MWh of net generation and other biomass 17 million MWh. [geo. +bio =32 m MWH – ~EQUALS wind] [-WHAT’s the rest??!]

Wind generation is rapidly gaining a larger share of total renewable generation. In 2007, wind accounted for 32.7 percent of total net generation from non-hydroelectric renewable sources, as compared to 4.3 percent in 1997. The annual growth in solar thermal and photovoltaic generation has been sufficient for this renewable source to account, on average, for 0.5 percent of all non-hydroelectric renewable energy.

One comment on “Falling Hydro, Rising Renewables wind from 4.3% to 32.7% net in renewables, excl. hydro in 10 years.

  1. From Jérôme Guillet

    Wind power set to decline under Obama?

    For the fourth consecutive year, the US set records in 2008 for the construction of new wind farms, with more than 8,300MW installed in the year, making the country the year for both yearly installations and, for the first time in many years, overall installed capacity (nudging out Germany which has long been the world leader). The sector created a record number of jobs at a time when few other sectors did.

    But for reasons linked to the inconsistent regulatory framework until now, and to the ongoing credit crisis, 2009 is likely to be a bad year for wind, with a decline in installations and, possibly, layoffs.
    Of course, Obama is not to blame for that situation, which he inherits, but it will be a pretty bad signal to see wind power decline significantly this year – and it would be an inexcusable one if that decline continues into 2010. The current stimulus plan does include measures to support the industry, but these seem oddly unambitious given the context of economic crisis and wind’s proven ability to create jobs and economic activity, to provide cheap power and to eliminate both carbon emissions and fossil fuel imports.

    http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2009/1/28/84358/6111/645/689900

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